NORI + BLACK SESAME MACRO BOWLS: MAIN

Macro bowls are a simplified way of eating nutrient-dense, whole foods with the added benefit that you don’t need to follow an ‘exact’ recipe. You get to choose your favourite seasonal vegetables, your preferred carbohydrate and protein sources and you can select from lots of extra superfood add ons depending on what you fancy.  It’s a good idea to batch cook rice, other grains or sweet potatoes in advance and roast a whole chicken so you can use the leftovers for quick meals or packed lunches during the week.

HOW TO MAKE THE PERFECT MACRO BOWL:

Foundation: each macro bowl is a combination of grains, vegetables, beans, meat or fish; and seaweeds or fermented foods such as sauerkraut or kimchi. There is no correct breakdown of macronutrients but here are some rough guidelines (men can double the wholegrain and protein portions).

Wholegrain: 1 heaped handful of cooked grains such as brown rice, quinoa, millet or cooked sweet potato.

Vegetables: 1-2 fistfuls of raw or very lightly steamed vegetables such as kale, spring onions, broccoli, carrots, beetroot, green beans.

Protein: A palm-sized portion of cooked free-range chicken breast or baked wild salmon; 150g raw, hard tofu or a cup of beans such as cooked edamame or black beans.

Fermented Foods or Sea Vegetables: 1-2 tablespoons. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi support healthy digestion and gut health. Sea vegetables such as nori, wakame, pulse and kombu are a valuable source of bioavailable essential minerals such as iodine, magnesium and sulphur and support hormonal health.

Seeds, Nuts, Oils + Condiments: Black or white sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds can be toasted for extra flavour. Toasted sesame oil and coconut oil are great for Asian themed bowls. Try extra virgin olive oil infused with red chilli, herbs or garlic for a Mediterranean theme.  For condiments I like tamari (a gluten free, non-GMO soy sauce), pickled ginger, pickled beetroot, tahini, basil or tomato pesto. Include 1-2 tbsp of seeds plus 1/2 to 1 tbsp oils or other oil based condiments.

FOR MY NORI + BLACK SESAME MACRO BOWELS

YOU WILL NEED:

(serves 1 – double / triple ingredients for additional servings).

  • 100g raw long-grain brown rice (weighs about 200g cooked)
  • 1/2 tbsp black sesame seeds
  • 1/2 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 tbsp tamari (gluten free soy sauce)
  • 1/2 tbsp toasted sesame oil or melted coconut oil*
  • 1 cooked, skinless chicken breast (125g) or, 2 soft-boiled eggs or, 1 cup cooked black beans or, 150g raw firm tofu
  • 1/2 large carrot, peeled and sliced into matchsticks
  • 1/4 sheet of nori (seaweed) cut into matchsticks using a scissors
  • 1 scallion, finely sliced

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cook the rice according to packet instructions (generally 1 part rice to 1.75 parts water and simmer for 15 minutes).
  2. Meanwhile prepare your choice of protein: shred the cooked chicken breast / place the eggs into a saucepan of water and simmer for 3 minutes, cool, remove the shell and halve / Drain the black beans and heat gently in a saucepan for 5 minutes / slice the tofu into cubes and stir into the rice.
  3. In a bowl combine the rice, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, tamari and coconut or sesame oil.
  4. To build the macro-bowl spoon the rice into the bowl. Add the chicken/egg/beans/tofu. Tuck the carrot matchsticks between the chicken and rice and sprinkle with spring onion, nori and extra sesame seeds. Serve.
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Servings Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
Chicken Breast Macro Bowl 434 15.5g 38.3g 32.4g 1.9g 4.1g
Egg Macro Bowl 424 23.6g 18.4g 32.3g 1.7g 3.5g

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores

TOASTED SOURDOUGH WITH: ALMOND & AVOCADO, COCONUT & BLUBERRY OR PEANUT BUTTER & BANANA! – SNACK

Toast. Pretty much universally adored and missed most by low carb aficionados (though they would completely deny it!!). The fact is bread is perfectly fine as part of a balanced diet. But I have only one rule. Please get yourself a decent loaf of real bread! That is, bread that doesn’t have a ‘best before’ date or more than 3-4 main ingredients (unless you are buying gluten-free). My top recommendation is a good quality sourdough.

Sourdough is more digestible and nutritious than industrial loaves thanks to naturally occurring acids that ferment the dough to bread down phytates (which impair nutrient absorption) and gluten (which may cause intolerances, though not to be confused with celiac disease). This fermentation process makes nutrients more available for absorption, and renders simple sugars less available, which may help to control blood sugar, particularly for people with diabetes.

This is not so much a strict recipe as it is a source of ideas for making a slice of toast into a nutritious, energy sustaining, mid-afternoon or evening snack. My advice is to stay away from overly processed shop bought spreads and try to make your own, or purchase whole, nut or seed spreads with no added sugars or oils. Real Irish butter, goats butter, olive oil or even coconut oil are also perfectly fine options if you’re not a fan of nut and seed spreads.

Serves: one to multiple

You will need:

  • Bread: 1 slice per person (I used a small loaf of german-style rye sourdough bread).
  • Nut Butters* (1 tbsp per person): choose from Meridian Almond butter, Meridian Peanut Butter and Coconut Butter.
  • Fruits: choose banana and avocado (3-4 slices per person), or blueberries (2 tbsp per person).
  • Nuts, Seeds & Sprinkles (1/3 tbsp) per person: 85% cacao dark chocolate (grated), black sesame seeds, coconut flake, ground cinnamon.

Topping Combinations featured:

  • Savoury: Crunchy Almond butter, Avocado & Black Sesame Seeds
  • A bit posh: Coconut butter, Crushed Blueberries & dark chocolate
  • Old-school: Crunchy Peanut butter, banana, cinnamon & coconut shavings

Instructions:

  1. Simple! Lay out small bowls and jars of your favourite toppings. Toast the bread and get creative!

To make your own coconut butter: dump 250g unsweetened desiccated coconut into a high-speed food processor and pulse for 8-10 minutes until smooth and runny. Decant into an airtight jar and store at room temperature. Note: coconut butter tends to harden even in the warmest cupboards. To soften, submerge the jar in warm water for 10 minutes before use.

To make other nut butters: you only need ONE ingredient to make any nut butter! Nuts! If you roast them in the oven for about 15 minutes at 150C (350F) you will get a lovely creamy texture as roasting helps to release the natural oils in nuts.  My favourites are walnuts, hazelnuts or almonds. Macadamias are also great but quite pricey! Cool the nuts slightly before tossing into a food processor and blending for about 8-10 minutes until smooth and creamy.  Store in an airtight jar.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Option Serving Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
Almond Butter, Avocado + Black Sesame Seeds 1 slice 266 15.7g 8g 26.7g 2.6g 5.8g
Coconut Butter, Blueberry & dark chocolate shavings 1 slice 239 13g 3.5g 28g 6.2g 3g
Peanut butter, banana & coconut 1 slice 259 11.1g 8.1g 32.6g 9.3g 4.4g

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores

SUPER-GREENS SKILLET-EGGS: MAIN

If you’ve been following my recipes over the last six weeks you’ll have read before that I tend to recommend a low carbohydrate, higher protein and fat breakfast; in particular for clients with goals to lose weight or regulate blood sugar and insulin levels.

I understand this can be a challenge, and cooked breakfasts often seem to take longer than a bowl of cereal. However I guarantee this recipe should take no longer than 10 minutes tops, and you will benefit from more stable energy levels throughout the morning and less sweet cravings as the day progresses.  I also like to recommend introducing some vegetables at breakfast, either in smoothie form or with eggs and avocado (it just makes that ‘5 to 7-a-day’ target less daunting!).

Eggs are such a great source of protein and micronutrients such as vitamin B12 and choline.  Poached, scrambled, fried or baked are all great. This is a one-pan recipe, and you can easily add more eggs if feeding a family.

Hardy winter greens such as kale, chard, cabbage and cavolo nero are cheap and easy to find at this time of year as well as being packed full of vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Serve straight from the pan with some sliced avocado or a tablespoon of plain natural yogurt, chilli flakes and a squeeze of vibrant lemon juice for a morning metabolism boost!

Serves: 2

Cooking time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil*
  • 100g brown mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 big handfuls of spinach or chard, roughly chopped
  • 1 big handful of curly kale (purple or green), roughly chopped
  • 4 free range eggs
  • Pinch of chilli flakes
  • Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • To serve (optional): Juice of 1/2 a lemon, 1 avocado, peeled and halved or 2tbsp full-fat natural yogurt (unsweetened)

Instructions

  1. In a large skillet melt the coconut oil over a medium heat and add the mushrooms. Cook for 3 minutes and add the spinach/chard and the kale as well as a tablespoon of water.
  2. As the greens begin to wilt, make 4 little ‘gaps’ in the greens for the eggs. Crack the eggs into the pan, cover with a lid and cook until the whites are set and the yolks still runny.
  3. Sprinkle with chilli flakes, sea salt and pepper and serve with sliced avocado or a dollop of natural yogurt and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
per serving 241 17.4g 17g 4.5g 2g 4.2g
per serving with avocado + lemon 360 28g 18.4g 11.3g 2.8g 9.2g
per serving with yogurt + lemon 280 19.3g 19.1g 8.3g 5.2g 4.2g

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores

CREAMY SQUASH, MUSHROOM & CHARD BAKE – MAIN

This creamy vegetarian bake is proof that comfort food need not be bad for you.  I replaced dairy cream with almond cream (available from health stores) which makes this dish suitable for vegans or those following a plant-based, dairy-free lifestyle. I did include some parmesan cheese to serve, but you can leave it out or sprinkle with toasted chopped hazelnuts for some additional texture or some nutritional yeast for a “cheesy” flavour.

We can be so used to the ‘meat & two veg’ formula that we tend to consider vegetables on their own, as an insufficient main meal. But adding shiitake mushrooms (or brown / portobello / chestnut mushrooms) provides a meaty texture and the addition of almond cream makes this dish more satisfying than you might think.

Mushrooms like shiitake can be hard to find but they’re incredibly nutritious and have been used for centuries in eastern traditions for their medicinal qualities. Shiitake mushrooms have been scientifically proven to help fight obesity1, support immune function2, inhibit the growth of cancer cells3 and support cardiovascular health4. They also provide vitamin D (something we are severely lacking in the northern hemisphere at this time of year!) and have antimicrobial qualities that can help to fight infection.

The recipe serves two people as a main course but you can stretch it to four servings if you want to use it as a side dish served with either Puy lentils or some roast chicken.

(serves 2 as a main course or 4 as a side dish)

Ingredients:

  • 1 small-medium squash (I used a coquina squash)
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin raw coconut oil* or olive oil
  • 125g shiitake mushrooms (or chestnut / brown mushrooms)
  • 150g rainbow chard, stalks removed and chopped finely, leaves torn in half
  • 300ml almond cream (I used Ecomil Cuisine)
  • 1 organic low-salt stock cube (I used Kallo Organic Mushroom Stock Cube)
  • 3/4 pint boiling water
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped thyme
  • 2 sage leaves, chopped finely
  • Sea salt & black pepper
  • Optional: 1-2 tbsp grated parmesan to serve

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 200C / Gas Mark 4 / 400F.
  2. Peel the squash, cut in half and then slice into half moon shapes, removing the seeds. Arrange the squash onto a roasting tray, add the garlic cloves (you don’t need to peel them) and drizzle with a teaspoon of oil. Season and transfer to the oven. Cook until tender (about 25 minutes).
  3. While the squash is in the oven heat the remaining oil in a cast iron skillet or pan over a medium heat. Brush any excess dirt from the mushrooms, and slice them into chunky pieces and lay them into the pan. Cook for about 5 minutes before turning and then add the rosemary, thyme and sage. Cook for another minute.
  4. Pour the boiling water and 200ml of the almond cream into the pan with the mushrooms, add the stock cube and stir. Bring to the boil and then simmer on a low heat for about 10-15 minutes.
  5. When the squash is ready, remove the roasting tray from the oven and leave aside to cool slightly. Remove the garlic cloves and gently squeeze the softened garlic bulbs into the pan with the mushrooms and almond cream (be careful that the skin from the garlic does not fall into the pan). Discard the skins.
  6. Take a lasagne or pie dish and arrange the chard stalks and some of the leaves on the bottom. Arrange a third of the squash on top of the chard and then pour half the creamy mushroom sauce over the top. Repeat 2 more times and then pour the remaining 100ml of almond cream over the top.
  7. Transfer to the oven and cook for about 30 minutes until bubbling and slightly browned on top.
  8. If adding parmesan cheese, remove the dish from the oven, sprinkle over the grated parmesan and place back into the oven for 5 minutes until the cheese is melted slightly. Remove from the oven and spoon the bake onto serving plates. Enjoy!
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Servings Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
Per half serving as a main course 439 24.6g 7g 40g 11g 4g
Per 1/4 serving as a side dish 110 6.2g 1.8g 10g 2.8g 1g

 

  1. Handayani, D., Chen, J., Meyer, B.J. and Huang, X.F. (2011) ‘Dietary Shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) prevents fat deposition and lowers Triglyceride in rats fed a high-fat diet, Journal of Obesity, 2011, pp. 1 doi: 10.1155/2011/258051.
  1. Dai, X., Stanilka, J.M., Rowe, C.A., Esteves, E.A., Nieves, C., Spaiser, S.J., Christman, M.C., Langkamp-Henken, B. and Percival, S.S. (2015) Consuming Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushrooms daily improves human immunity: A Randomized dietary intervention in healthy young adults, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 34(6), pp. 478 doi: 10.1080/07315724.2014.950391.
  1. Fang, N., Li, Q., Yu, S., Zhang, J., He, L., Ronis, M.J.J. and Badger, T.M. (2006) Inhibition of growth and induction of Apoptosis in human cancer cell lines by an ethyl acetate fraction from Shiitake mushrooms, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 12(2), pp. 125–132. doi: 10.1089/acm.2006.12.125.
  1. KABIR, Y., YAMAGUCHI, M. and KIMURA, S. (1987) Effect of shiitake(Lentinus edodes) and maitake(Grifola frondosa) mushrooms on blood pressure and plasma lipids of spontaneously hypertensive rats, Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 33(5), pp. 341–346. doi: 10.3177/jnsv.33.341.

 

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores

CHOCOLATE FRUIT & NUT SQUARES – SNACK

Combining nuts and dates to create tasty raw treats is nothing new, a very well known chocolate confectionery brand has been doing a fruit & nut bar since 1926 and we all remember the ad campaign slogan sung to the tune of The Nutcracker!  I understand that the point to snack foods is that they are convenient. That being said putting an hour’s effort into making your own treats means you have a ready supply in the fridge for weeks, but more importantly you are avoiding ingredients such as artificial flavourings, emulsifiers and inflammatory vegetable fats, as well excessive sugar and trans fats.

A standard shop-bought fruit & nut bar will serve up 270 calories and 30g of sugar, which is  listed as the second ingredient after milk. In comparison this recipe provides 182 calories per serving and only 8g of sugars. There is no added vegetable oils with the only fats coming from the natural fats found in whole nuts and seeds that are linked to improved cognitive function, lower body fat, better blood lipid profile and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Using whole, natural foods provides fibre and a range of nutrients including antioxidant vitamin E, biotin for healthy skin, hair and nails, magnesium, manganese and copper. Even chocolate has its benefits but you must choose the darker kind. The darker the chocolate, the less likely there is to be added ingredients such as soya lecithin and other emulsifiers. I like either Green & Blacks Organic 85% or Lindt as ingredients are simply cocoa, cocoa butter, sugar and vanilla.

Given the sheer variety of nuts, seeds and superfood powders available these days there are endless options to cater for everyone’s tastes. Chocolate and hazelnuts are an age-old match made in heaven but you can use equivalent quantities of other nuts and seeds depending on your preferences or whatever you have available. You can also leave out the chocolate (but why would you want to do that?!).

(makes 16 bars)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (140g) whole almonds
  • 1 cup (135g) whole hazelnuts
  • 1/4 cup (40g) hulled hemp seeds (NUA NATURALS)*
  • 10 dates (sulphur-free, pitted)
  • 1/4 cup (3-4 tbsp) maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 cup (50g) jumbo oats
  • 2 Tbsp coconut flour(NUA NATURALS)*
  • 100g 85% dark chocolate
  • Coconut oil for lining the baking tray (OPTIMA)*

Topping Options: toasted coconut flakes, cacao nibs, chopped hazelnuts

Instructions

  1. Line a bakingtray with parchment and spread with a little melted coconut oil.
  2. In a blenderpulse the almonds and hazelnuts until they look like a coarse sand.
  3. Add the hemp seeds, dates, maple syrup, salt, oats andcoconut flour. Blitz again until well combined. The mixture should ‘stick’ a little when pressed.
  4. Dump the mixture onto the lined baking tray and use your hands to press down until its about an inch thick. If the tray is larger than normal, fold the parchment in over the free edge of the mixture.
  5. Refrigerate for an hour to set.
  6. In the meantime break the chocolate into small pieces and place into aPyrex dish over a pan of hot water. Make sure the water doesn’t touch the base of the bowl. Allow the chocolate to melt completely and then remove from the stove.
  7. Remove the nut mixture from the fridge and pourthe chocolate over the top, tilting the baking tray around until the chocolate is evenly spread.
  8. Sprinkle with your chosen topping and place back into the fridge to set.
  9. Once set use a sharp knife to cut into squares. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 weeks or in the freezer for 8 weeks.
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
182 13g 5g 13.3g 8g 3g
An excellent source of vitamin E, biotin, manganese, copper, magnesium & antioxidants

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores

‘CHIA-LOVE’ BREAKFAST BOWLS – BREAKFAST

Everyone says they don’t “do” St. Valentines Day but secretly we all kind of buy-in to it, if not only to indulge in a little self love. Its not V-Day for another week yet,  but it’s good to be prepared so Im sharing this shamelessly pink breakfast recipe with you in advance.

Truthfully, only after I put the ingredients together did I realise that pomegranate fruit and maca powder are considered in many cultures as natural aphrodisiacs, and have been associated with hormonal health and fertility.  In the interest of science, there is some evidence that can attest to pomegranate juice increasing salivary testosterone levels in men by about 24%; whilst the ingestion of Maca root appears to increase libido in both genders, with three notable studies showing fairly consistent results.

A 30g serving of chia seeds contains 11 grams of fibre, 4g of protein and 5g of omega-3 fatty acid as well as providing almost a third of the recommended daily intake magnesium, manganese and phosphorous. This is particularly impressive when you consider just 30g has only 140 calories, making chia seeds highly nutrient dense.

This fibre and protein rich recipe is an ideal breakfast option and will provide sustained energy and keep you satisfied well into the day whilst the antioxidants and phytonutrients found in raspberries and pomegranate support the immune system and help to repair cell and tissue damage caused by free radicals.

RECIPE

(makes 2 breakfast servings or 4 small, snack-size servings)

  • 2 cups (475 ml) of unsweetened almond or coconut milk (I use Ecomil or Oatly brands)
  • 1/2 cup (6 level tbsp) whole chia seeds*
  • 1 heaped teaspoon of maca powder*
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla powder (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon of ashwagandha powder*
  • 1 cup (about 125g) raspberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds (about 4 tbsp)
  • 1 Tbsp light tahini (I use Meridian)

To serve

  • 1 Tbsp unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • A few raspberries and some pomegranate seeds

Instructions:

  1. Put the chia seeds, milk, maca, vanilla and ashwagandha (if you’re using it) into a jar with a lid and shake vigorously, ensuring the chia seeds are well combined. Leave aside either overnight or for 10-20 minutes until the mixture thickens (it will look like frog spawn!).
  2. Transfer most of the raspberries and pomegranate to a blender cup (reserve some of the fruit for a topping). Add the tahini and a splash of water. Pulse the fruit until completely mixed.  It will be quite thick which is fine. If you don’t have a blender you could mash the fruit and tahini together with a fork or use a hand-held blender.
  3. When the chia seeds thick and gloopy, combine them with the fruit mixture and stir well.
  4. Transfer to bowls or airtight glass jars (for portability) and top with coconut and fruit. Enjoy!
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Servings Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
Per half portion 420 29g 11g 42g 14g 21g
Per quarter portion 105 7.25g 2.75g 10.5g 3.5g 5.3g

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

CHICKPEA FLOUR FLATBREADS, ROCKET PESTO + VEGGIES – MAIN

I love the beginning of the Rugby Six Nations for the sole reason that it coincides with the coming of Spring!  There’s always a great atmosphere and I know lots of friends and families who gather at home to watch the games.

If you’ve signed up for the Lloyds Pharmacy Change Your Health Direction Programme, or have simply resolved to eat more nutritious, whole-foods for 2017, having friends and family over on match-day (or in general!) can be a challenge and its tempting to reach for the takeaway menus!  But what if you didn’t have to compromise?!

This veggie flatbread tastes like it should be a treat and yet its super-healthy! I used chickpea flour for the flatbread base – an ideal gluten and grain-free alternative to refined, white flour, and you will benefit from a higher protein and fibre content as well.

To keep the nutrient density up I made pesto with rocket leaves and walnuts, and used a variety of colourful vegetables as toppings.  You can add a little parmesan cheese, chilli oil or toasted pine nuts at the end for more flavour.

These are a winner with kids –  they love pizza, and bright colours so if you’re changing your entire family’s health direction, this is the recipe for you!

RECIPE

(makes 2 large flatbreads; serves  6-8)

For the flatbreads:

  • 2 cups of chickpea flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • 1 good pinch of sea salt
  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing
  • 6 Tbsp water

For the Rocket Pesto:  (if you really want to save time, use a good quality shop-bought basil or red tomato pesto)

  • 3 large handfuls of rocket leaves, washed
  • Extra virgin olive oil, you will need about 6 tbsp
  • A handful of walnut halves
  • A handful of grated parmesan (optional, you could use nutritional yeast as a dairy-free alternative)
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • Sea salt + black pepper

Toppings:

  • 1 courgette, peeled into ribbons with a vegetable peeler
  • 1 red onion, peeled, halved and sliced into half-moon shapes
  • 1 long red pepper, cut thinly across the horizontal, into rings
  • 1 small golden beetroot, peeled and sliced very finely
  • Optional: shavings of Parmesan or Grana Padano cheese / toasted pine nuts / rocket leaves / chilli oil

Instructions:

For the flatbread:

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the chickpea flour, baking powder and sea salt. Pour in the olive oil and use your fingers to combine the mixture until it resembles a coarse crumb.
  2. Add the water by tablespoon, working the water in using your hands until the dough starts to come together. If after adding 6 tablespoons the dough feels too dry, add another tablespoon of water. Similarly, if the dough is sticky and wet, add a little extra chickpea flour. The dough should be pliable!
  3. Shape the dough into a smooth round and brush the surface with olive oil. Cover with a linen tea cloth and leave to rest at room temperature for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Divide the dough into two even pieces. Dust your worktop with chickpea flour and form one piece of dough into a disc. Flour the top of the dough and using a rolling pin (or a glass water bottle!) roll the dough into a thin 9-inch circle (or rectangular shape). If the edges crack just pinch them together. Repeat with the second piece of dough and don’t worry about creating perfect shapes!!

For the rocket pesto:

  1. Put the rocket into a for processor and add a good glug of olive oil to get it going. Pulse until the rocket is broken down (you might need to scrape the mixture down from the sides and pulse again).
  2. Add the walnuts, parmesan, garlic cloves and lemon juice and pulse again to combine.
  3. Scrape the mixture down from the sides one last time and replace the lid. Then switch on the blender and gradually pour the olive oil into the mixing bowl. You want to achieve a good spreadable consistency.

Prepare the vegetables:

  1. Use a vegetable peeler to make courgette ‘ribbons’.
  2. Peel and finely slice the beetroot with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  3. Peel the red onion, cut it in half and then slice into ‘half-moon’ shapes, slice a long, thin red pepper horizontally, shake out the seeds and slice thinly into rings.

Assemble the flatbread:

  • Preheat oven to 200C (400F) with the baking sheets inside (I used one circular and one rectangular sheet)
  • When the oven is hot, carefully remove the baking sheets and set them down onto a heat proof surface. Transfer the flatbreads onto the pre-heated baking sheets.
  • Spread each flatbread with the rocket pesto and arrange the vegetables on top until the dough is covered. Use a pastry brush to lightly brush the vegetables with olive oil.  Season with a little sea salt and black pepper.
  • Transfer the flatbreads into the oven and bake for about 20 minutes – 25 minutes until the edges of the dough are crispy and the vegetables are cooked.
  • Remove from the oven and dress with rocket leaves, pine nuts, chilli oil or parmesan shavings. Serve and enjoy!
NUTRITION INFORMATION
Servings Calories Fat Protein Carbs Sugars Fibre
Per 1 whole (plain) flatbread 476 20g 22g 53g 5g 12g
Per 1/6th (plain) flatbread recipe 159 7g 7g 18g 2g 4g
Rocket Pesto (per 1/6th recipe) 179 19g 2g 2g 0.5g 0.6g
Per 1/6th serving flatbread with pesto + toppings (not incl. extra parmesan / pine nuts. 370 26 10g 26g 5g 6g

PAMELA RYAN | NUTRITIONIST | CORPORATE NUTRITION + YOGA

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist