Top Tips For Runners—beginners, marathoners, and everyone in between!

Last Thursday I donned my brand new Asics trainers and headed out to the Blanchardstown indoor arena with over 100 other runners to meet and run with the gorgeous Paula Radcliffe. My goodness she really is a superstar. Lovely and open, she posed beside each and every one of us would-be marathon runners for a picture and seemed very happy to do so.  She then answered our questions in an informal Q&A session bestowing upon us her in depth knowledge of the sport that is endurance running.

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Her main take home points were:

  • Quality not quantity running- obviously putting in the miles is important but what is more important is varying the route, surface and pace at which you run.
  • Eating very soon after a long run is a must- prepare a meal before you go out for your run so that you just have to reheat it. Paula said she always eats within 5 minutes of returning home from a run. She advises not to forget to include protein in this meal for muscle recovery- even if this only involves a handful of nuts.
  • Ice baths are great for reducing inflammation in the limbs after a run and allow the muscles and joints to recover much quicker. Paula said that at the height of her training she would get into an ice bath as soon as possible after a run with a nice cup of hot tea!

Paula has had ongoing problems with arthritis in her foot for many years but since she started taking Revive Active Joint Complex she has felt a considerable reduction in the pain that this causes her.

I myself have run long distances on and off over many years. I tend to pick it up a bit more during the spring and summer months and retire my trainers to the wardrobe during the winter due to the shorter daylight hours. I do try to muster a 10k every couple of weeks though as I absolutely adore the freedom of running.  The endorphins that flood my body after a long run are like no other exercise. I also practice yoga to keep my ligaments and muscles long, lean and strong and swim for cardio. I find that both of these activities compliment my running, particularly yoga as one definitely needs a weight bearing exercise (says Queen Paula!) and yoga provides me with this. I also take Revive Active everyday as it gives me the energy that I need to work, be a Mum and do the occasional 5k run with Paula Radcliffe!

It is very important if you are a newbie to running that you take it easy at first and build your distances up gradually. There is no point over doing it at the start as you are highly likely to injure yourself. Start with one, two then three kilometer distances every couple of days. You will be surprised how quickly your stamina and fitness will build (the downside of this of course is that your fitness reduces quickly too if you miss a couple of weeks-you have been warned!) Make sure you get plenty of sleep. A nap in the middle of the day is ideal, but you would probably not be considered an ideal employee if you were doing this regularly! Of course you also need to fuel your body with the right nutrients- a diet rich in fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meat is perfect. A high quality Vitamin and Mineral supplement can only compliment this. Finally, enjoy it! Running can help you to look AND feel great. It’s the perfect exercise for your mind, body and soul!

Written by Laura Dowling, Pharmacist in LloydsPharmacy Stillorgan S.C

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Strawberry Swirl Frozen Yogurt Terrine

Berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries etc) are by far the most nutrient dense of all fruits, and there is now solid evidence that the plant compounds and antioxidants found in berries may protect the brain from age-related disease. Strawberries are an exceptionally rich source of antioxidants associated with numerous health benefits from heart health, lowering blood sugar and helping to prevent cancer. Strawberries are particularly high in vitamin C (a potent antioxidant), manganese (important for multiple biological processes), folate (essential for cell function and tissue growth) and potassium (regulates blood pressure).  I use non-fat Greek yogurt for this recipe as fat is added-back using hazelnuts (hazelnuts, like olive oil, contain healthier monounsaturated fatty acids). Dark chocolate is of course a delicious, nutrient dense add-on but feel free to leave it out if you prefer.  The terrine can be prepared up to 1 week in advance and stored in the freezer.

Serves 8 | Preparation Time: 15-20 minutes + 8hrs to set | Rating: Moderate

You Will Need:

  • 1x 8-by-4-inch loaf tin
  • Plastic wrap
  • 2x 500g tubs of 0% fat Greek yogurt (or shop bought plain frozen yogurt, softened slightly)
  • 2 tbsp raw honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla powder
  • 250g fresh or frozen strawberries
  • 60g chopped toasted hazelnuts
  • 50g 85% cacao dark chocolate

Method:

  1. Line an 8-by-4 inch loaf tin with plastic wrap, leaving a few inches of overhang all around.
  2. In a bowl combine the yogurt (or softened frozen yogurt), honey and vanilla and set aside (*see recipe notes).
  3. Blend the strawberries with a splash of water until pureed.
  4. Fold the strawberry puree gently into the yogurt to create a marble effect (don’t stir through completely).
  5. Pour half of the yogurt & strawberry mixture into the loaf tin. Tap the tin gently onto an even surface to distribute the mixture (store the rest of the yogurt in the fridge until ready to use for the second layer).
  6. Sprinkle the hazelnuts on top to cover the yogurt completely. Then roughly chop the dark chocolate and do the same.
  7. Cover lightly and freeze for about 2 hours until the top is partially set. Remove from the freezer and pour over the remaining yogurt mixture.
  8. Cover completely with the plastic wrap and place back into the freezer for at least 8 hours (or overnight) until completely set (you can store in the freezer for up to five days).
  9. To serve, carefully remove the terrine from the loaf tin and place onto a plate. Peel of the plastic wrap and cut the terrine into 1/2-inch thick slices.

Nutrition

*Recipe Notes: using plain Greek yogurt without an ice cream maker can cause ice crystals to form in the terrine. To serve allow the terrine to soften at room temperature before slicing using a knife rinsed under hot water. The alternative is to churn the yogurt in an ice-cream maker before adding the strawberry purée, or to use a shop bought plain frozen yogurt (again, soften before use).

Created by: Pamela Ryan Qualified Nutritionist**

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

** Pamela Ryan (Dip.NT, NTOI) is a Qualified Nutritional Therapist recognised by the Nutritional Therapists of Ireland (NTOI), the professional association supporting qualified nutritional therapists. All NTOI members study biomedicine and nutrition for a minimum of 3 years at a recognised college, are trained in clinical practice and must comply with NTOI requirements for Continuous Professional Development (CPD). Nutritional Therapy is an evidence-based approach to maximising health through individually formulated nutrition and lifestyle strategies. Pamela continues to attend training and lectures on a regular basis through various bodies including The Institute of Functional Medicine and The Institute of Health Sciences. These trainings help her to gain increased expertise in the ever advancing field of nutrition.

Antioxidant Blueberry Smoothie


There are lots of great smoothie recipes available these days, and for the most part it, if you combine any fruit or veg with a liquid, you’ve got a great meal. But I wanted to create something that has a little more nutritional purpose using foods that are truly evidence based as being effective in supporting the immune system, brain function, energy levels and reducing inflammation.  Each of the ingredients here has been carefully considered for their nutrition density – leafy greens, blueberries, walnuts and cacao contain potent antioxidants that protect our cells and tissues from damage, omega-3 fatty acids (DHA, EPA and ALA) in Eskimo Fish Oils and Walnuts (respectively) support brain health and reduce inflammation, and plain Greek yogurt is a great source of protein. Shine plant based protein powder provides an added protein boost, along with its other ingredients such as spirulina  which provides a number of essential B vitamins and iron.  The fish oils are of course optional, but I guarantee there is no strange taste and is a great way of including fish oils in your diet if you find it hard to take directly off the spoon! Serves two as a meal or divide into four as an accompaniment to breakfast or as an afternoon snack

Serves 2-4 | Preparation Time: 5 minutes | Rating: Easy

Nutrition: approx. 323 calories per serving. Protein-rich, a source of omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants.

Ingredients:

*you will need a blender / hand blender

  • 2 cups cold water (ice optional)
  • 2 cups baby spinach leaves (washed)
  • 125g blueberries (fresh or frozen, washed)
  • 150g 0%-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 banana, peeled and sliced
  • 1 heaped tablespoon Shine Protein (available in LloydsPharmacies nationwide)
  • 1oz (about 28g) raw walnut halves
  • 2 squares (20g) 85% cacao dark chocolate
  • 1-2 teaspoons of Eskimo-3 Pure Omega Fish Oil (available in LloydsPharmacies nationwide)

Method:

  1. Pour the water into a a large blender cup, add the spinach and blueberries and pulse to break down.
  2. Remove the lid, add the remaining ingredients, and blend again until smooth.
  3. Divide between 2 glasses and serve (can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 days)

Created by: Pamela Ryan Qualified Nutritionist*

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

* Pamela Ryan (Dip.NT, NTOI) is a Qualified Nutritional Therapist recognised by the Nutritional Therapists of Ireland (NTOI), the professional association supporting qualified nutritional therapists. All NTOI members study biomedicine and nutrition for a minimum of 3 years at a recognised college, are trained in clinical practice and must comply with NTOI requirements for Continuous Professional Development (CPD). Nutritional Therapy is an evidence-based approach to maximising health through individually formulated nutrition and lifestyle strategies. Pamela continues to attend training and lectures on a regular basis through various bodies including The Institute of Functional Medicine and The Institute of Health Sciences. These trainings help her to gain increased expertise in the ever advancing field of nutrition.

Walnut Brownies

I use only four ingredients – walnuts, cacao, dates and vanilla. Walnuts are rich in omega-3 fats which may improve brain health and prevent heart disease. I’ve spoken about the benefits of eating good quality dark chocolate before, and raw cacao powder is just as nutritious. Cacao is loaded with antioxidants (one of the highest sources along with blueberries and walnuts), as well as iron, copper and magnesium which are essential for energy metabolism (the process of generating energy). Feel free to substitute some of the walnuts for ground almonds, or you could use a combination of your favourite nuts. Replacing the vanilla powder with a tablespoon of good  quality espresso powder is another very popular option!

Makes: 15 | Prep Time: 15 minutes | Rating: Simple

Nutrition: approx.193 calories per serving. Source of omega-3 fatty acids, fibre, iron, magnesium

Ingredients:

  • 150g pitted dates (try to use preservative-free dates)
  • 300g raw walnuts (plus 15g extra for topping – optional)
  • 70g raw cacao powder (plus a little extra for dusting – optional)
  • 15g dark chocolate drops (optional, replace with 15g walnuts if not using)
  • 1 heaped teaspoon vanilla powder

Method:

  1. Tip the dates into a heatproof bowl, cover with hot water and leave to soak for ten minutes to soften.
  2. Meanwhile pulse the walnuts, cacao powder and vanilla in a food processor until they resemble coarse breadcrumbs.
  3. Once the dates have softened drain off the water and add them to the food processor. Pulse the mixture again a few times until a dough forms.
  4. Tip the mixture onto the lined baking tray and press out into the corners. To even out the top place a sheet of parchment on top of the mixture and use a rolling pin or the palm of your hand to smooth out the mixture.
  5. Refrigerate for about an hour to set before slicing into squares. Press some chopped walnuts on top of each brownie and dust lightly with a little cacao powder or some cinnamon.

Created by: Pamela Ryan Qualified Nutritionist*

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

* Pamela Ryan (Dip.NT, NTOI) is a Qualified Nutritional Therapist recognised by the Nutritional Therapists of Ireland (NTOI), the professional association supporting qualified nutritional therapists. All NTOI members study biomedicine and nutrition for a minimum of 3 years at a recognised college, are trained in clinical practice and must comply with NTOI requirements for Continuous Professional Development (CPD). Nutritional Therapy is an evidence-based approach to maximising health through individually formulated nutrition and lifestyle strategies. Pamela continues to attend training and lectures on a regular basis through various bodies including The Institute of Functional Medicine and The Institute of Health Sciences. These trainings help her to gain increased expertise in the ever advancing field of nutrition.

Barbecue Turkey Skewers with Tahini Dip

These Middle Eastern inspired turkey skewers are ideal for a summer barbecue or picnic, and can be packed into lunch boxes for a work week lunch served with grilled pitta breads, fresh leafy greens and gut-loving kimchi (fermented vegetables). The recipe makes between two and four servings as a light lunch or larger meal. Serving suggestions are optional of course so free to improvise. A big green salad, fresh hummus, and a bowl of tabbouleh (a herby salad made with bulgur wheat, tomatoes, lots of fresh mint and parsley) are great healthy options for a summer feast!

Serves: 2-4 | Cooking Time: 15 minutes | Rating: Simple

Nutrition: High Protein, Low Fat, Low Saturated Fat

Free From: Gluten, Wheat, Dairy, Refined Sugar

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic, peeled and crushed
  • Juice and rind of half a large lemon
  • 1 heaped teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 heaped teaspoon of dried or finely chopped oregano
  • A good pinch of sea salt
  • 3 large skinless turkey breasts cut into strips
  • 6 wooden or metal skewers

Tahini Dip

  • 2 tbsp light tahini
  • 2 tbsp water
  • Juice of 1 whole lemon
  • A good pinch of sea salt
  • 1 garlic clove peeled

To Serve:

Rocket leaves, diced cucumber, kimchi, grilled pitta pockets or flatbreads.

Method:

  1. If using wooden skewers, soak them in cool water whilst marinading the turkey (about 20 mins).
  2. In a large mixing bowl combine the olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, lemon rind, cumin, oregano and sea salt. Add the turkey strips and mix to combine. Cover and leave to marinate for at least 20 minutes (or overnight in the fridge).
  3. Preheat the grill or barbecue to a medium temperature. Remove the turkey from the marinade and thread onto the six skewers (you can discard the marinade).
  4. Place the skewers directly onto the barbecue grill and cook for about 8-10 minutes until cooked and slightly charred.
  5. To make the dip, put the tahini, water, lemon juice, salt and garlic into a small blender and pulse until combined (or whisk together with a fork, making sure to chop and crush the garlic into a paste with the back of a knife first). The dip should have a yogurt-like consistency.
  6. Transfer the dip to a bowl. Remove the turkey skewers from the grill and transfer to a plate lined with parchment.
  7. Serve with grilled pitta pockets or flatbreads (if coeliac or gluten-intolerant you can buy gluten free pittas in most supermarkets), piles of fresh rocket leaves, some fermented vegetables like kimchi or finely diced cucumber.

Nutrition Information

Created by: Pamela Ryan Qualified Nutritionist

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

Let us help you control those Bad Behaviours!

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Donal – Pharmacist Aylesbury

The more i read from the latest research articles the more it seems that the old sayings we’ve heard repeated again and again about food, sleep and exercise are true. We should go to bed early, eat natural foods and exercise every day.

But often in the media we see people who break these rules idolised and celebrated. People who work around the clock, who party through the night, people who binge and diet in repeated cycles. These behaviours are enticing and misleading. Often we believe we can accomplish something greater, meet deadlines by pushing through walls of fatigue, or that we can make up for bad eating behaviours afterwards by upping our exercise regimen.

I  will often hear people relate and discuss behaviours such as late night snacking, insatiable appetites and craving snacks, remarking on them as inexplicable and unavoidable. Night binging can leave a person with low energy levels the next day. People who regularly do this often have high insulin levels which can lead to diabetes and they find it difficult to exercise from fatigue and lack of sleep. Without knowing how our bodies work it can be difficult to understand where these cravings come from. Being now in my thirties some of these bad habits have already caught up with me and I see the effects of poor diet and snacking in my energy levels and some of my blood tests. Not a good scenario to be in at such a “young” age. LOL.

What I have found helpful in trying to control my own bad behaviours is an understanding of what exactly is going on in my body to drive these unhealthy habits I seem drawn to constantly repeat. In this blog I will briefly discuss one aspect of the body’s many mechanisms that control appetite, weight fluctuations and as researchers are currently finding out potentially a lot more.

Ghrelin is an appetite stimulating hormone released from the empty stomach. It signals our brain to encourage anticipatory and goal-directed behaviours. This basically means it makes us look out for our next meal, make us think about food and it affects what we crave in terms of sugar, fat, protein and carbohydrates. On its own ghrelin seems to direct us toward a more nutritious meal than we might choose without its influence. This might sound familiar if you think of what you crave when you are really hungry. Usually the ice cream, chocolate or biscuit treat (my personal favourites!) doesn’t seem sufficient and we actually want a heart slap up meal with more nutritious ingredients. This is actually a good effect of the hormone.

However studies have shown that as ghrelin levels rise, the amount of eating it encourages rises dramatically. This makes sense in the natural world. The longer the period between eating the more our body is going to want to stock up on energy the next time food is available. However this effect is contributing to our modern day obesity problem. We have such busy lives that people are often jumping from the bed out the door skipping what the old maxim calls the most important meal of the day. Breakfast. Breaking the fast.

As we sleep our bodies are stilling whirring away with countless processes like a laptop on standby. In fact the energy our body would use if we were to simply lie on the couch all day accounts for up to 60 to 70% of the energy we spend each day even when we move around and work as normal. That is why it is so important to supply your body with a source of healthy energy soon after waking up in the morning. Otherwise the body will demand an even greater meal off you later in the day.

Studies have shown that  ghrelin, the hunger hormone, will not be suppressed without a proper breakfast. People who skip breakfast think they are cutting out part of their day’s calorie intake but it is proven that those people eat more for lunch, dinner AND supper partly due to higher ghrelin levels the skipped breakfast causes.

Also sleep deprivation has been shown to increase cortisol (our stress hormone) and in doing so mimic starvation and hunger. Both stress and cortisol increase our hunger hormone ghrelin which increases our cravings and likelihood to overeat. Poor sleep is another of the factors linked to increasing obesity in Ireland.

There are several ways we can affect our ghrelin levels. One large egg provides varying amounts of 13 essential vitamins and minerals, high-quality protein, and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin yet regular consumption of eggs is still met with uncertainty. In the 1970s excess cholesterol in our blood was linked to a higher risk of heart disease. Many scientists assumed that eating high-cholesterol foods like butter, red meat and eggs must then be bad for our health. In fact sugar, trans fats or excessive saturated fat is more harmful to use and produces more cholesterol in our blood that dietary cholesterol.

In a study comparing eating eggs for breakfast versus a bowl of healthy oatmeal on the symptoms of heart disease (a change in the cholesterol and lipid balance in the body) there was not a huge difference between the two. The eggs did raise cholesterol levels somewhat compared to the oatmeal but not in an unhealthy amount and the sugar levels, liver function and fat levels in the body were the same. The eggs did seem to keep the person eating them fuller for a longer time than the porridge. I have tried alternating both porridge and a boiled egg into my breakfast regime and from my experience I can see how an egg can help space out meals across a day and prevent the urge to snack in between. But the benefits of porridge on health are also proven so if anything I would recommend fitting both into your morning diet if possible.

Being a daily porridge devourer I want to explain how it can benefit you. When food enters the stomach it lowers your ghrelin but it doesn’t stop you from eating. The signal for satiety and to stop eating is actually located twenty two feet or almost seven meters into the intestine! Naturally it takes time for food to travel this far. The Japanese have a saying which is “eat until you are 80% full” which is basically allowing your food time to reach this point. Alternatively trying to eat with chopsticks will get you there! The best way to get food moving faster through the intestine is through fiber.

Ever notice how a plate of pasta or chips and cheeseburgers doesn’t always make you feel full? This is because fast food and processed cereals have had their fibre stripped away to improve taste and shelf life. They sit into your stomach instead of moving into the intestine where they should be signalling the brain that the stomach is full. Anything that speeds food transit through the gut will make you feel fuller faster and reduce hunger and the amount eaten. The insoluble fiber in porridge does this. Its soluble fiber also helps by forming a sticky gel that delays stomach emptying which makes you feel fuller faster. Processed foods and cereals contain little of these or have it artificially added back in which doesn’t seem to work as well as when it is in its original form.

There was a study I found interesting on how water, milk, a yogurt drink and fruit juice drunk either before or with a meal would affect appetite, satiety (feeling full after eating) and the amount of food eaten. Milk reduced the overall  food intake and appetite while increasing the satiety (feeling full after meal) compared to a sweetened yogurt or fruit drink. But in all cases drinking water meant the overall calorie intake was less before and after the meal. One esteemed dietician in America suggested keeping to milk, water and tea only as the beverages of choice and leaving the rest out of our diets. Sugary beverages and even fruit juice are thought to be unnecessary additions to our diet that we might be better avoiding. Fruit it appears is best eaten whole rather than juiced or pulverised into a smoothie. Also I will add in here that fructose which is known simply as sugar when it comes to talking about our modern processed foods does not affect ghrelin release unlike other carbohydrates and proteins which lower ghrelin levels. So sweets and sugary drinks in the morning will not reduce the amount of food you are likely to consume later for lunch and dinner compared to the egg and porridge discussed earlier.

Is it better to spread out calorie intake over a period rather than breaking the day into say three solid meal times? One study used liquid meals of protein, fat and carbohydrates taken in a single go versus splitting it up into five smaller portions taken every half hour to examine this idea. No difference was found in how the food was burnt off meaning that splitting meals up across the day has little effect on avoiding hunger later in the day or keeping up your energy. In fact where the food was consumed in a single go the people reported great and longer lasting fullness.

We often hear about losing weight by different approaches (intermittent or irregular dieting versus continuous dieting). A study tried to determine the effect of this on the body’s systems and discovered little difference in how the body was reacting to the weight loss. The people who achieved the same weight loss by dieting on and off seemed to be under no greater or lesser drive by their bodies to regain weight than those who had dieted in a more consistent manner. To me this study shows the power of habit. Studies have shown that consistent dieting has a greater chance of success but this study shows there is no biological measurement (in terms of hunger hormone, insulin levels) to account for it. Making lifestyle changes your everyday practice is the way to sustain weight loss because the likelihood that all lost weight will be regained is simply the reflection of how likely you are to return to old habits if you haven’t been practicing new ones.

So in summary breakfast is still the main meal of the day. Don’t skip it and try to have healthy oats and maybe an egg as a large part of it, though don’t forget your daily intake of whole fruit. We in LloydsPharmacy are here to support you in attaining a healthy lifestyle and so we can advise you on your diet, help motivate you and supply a range of products that will boost the positive changes you make in your daily life. Chromium is supposed to aid in reducing cravings by enhancing insulin function and effect in the body. Our pharmacies can supply this in more than one brand (Sona or Pharmanord). Products such as Miss Fit Skinny Tea and XLS Medical have proven popular among customers who are making healthy changes in their diets. We have Change Your Health Direction experts in each store so please pop in and tell us how you are doing and ask us how we can help.

 

 

Coconut Fish Fingers + Smashed Peas

This classic combination gets a healthy overhaul! Coconut, a hint of cayenne pepper, fresh lime, mint and sweet peas make for a light, summertime dish. Serve with a big salad of fresh leafy greens or stuff them inside wholegrain pitta breads for a great picnic lunch. We won’t mind if you add a little tomato ketchup on the side either!

Serves: 2 | Cooking Time: 25 minutes | Rating: Simple

Free From: gluten, wheat, cow’s dairy, refined sugar and meat

Ingredients:

  • 2 fresh cod fillets (about 250g – 300g)
  • 40g coconut flour, almond flour or gluten free plain flour
  • 1 large free-range egg
  • 50g desiccated coconut
  • A good pinch of sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tbsp Optima raw virgin coconut oil*
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 4-5 fresh mint leaves
  • Juice of half a lime
  • 2 tbsp water
  • A pinch of sea salt

To serve:

  • Fresh mixed leafy greens
  • A good quality natural tomato ketchup (optional)

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 200 C (400 F).
  2. Crack the egg into a small bowl and lightly beat. Lay out two small plates, one with the coconut flour and the other with the desiccated coconut.
  3. Slice the fish into finger-width strips.
  4. Coat the fish strips with the flour, dipping them into the egg and then coat them with the desiccated coconut.
  5. Lay each coated strip carefully onto a non-stick baking tray. Sprinkle the goujons with sea salt, cayenne pepper and drizzle over the coconut oil.
  6. Bake for 10-15 minutes, until golden.
  7. Meanwhile prepare the smashed peas. Place the peas into a large bowl and cover with boiling water until thawed. Drain in a sieve and plunge into cool water to stop the peas from losing their colour.
  8. Tip the peas into a blender or food processor. Add the mint leaves, water, lime juice and a pinch of sea salt. Pulse the peas a few times until crushed (you could also do this with a fork, just make sure to finely chop the mint leaves first).
  9. Transfer the smashed peas to a serving bowl. Remove the fish goujons from the oven and pile onto a serving dish with mixed leafy greens. Serve.

NutritionInformation

Created by: Pamela Ryan Qualified Nutritionist

Website: www.thehealthonist.com

Instagram: @the_healthonist

*Available in LloydsPharmacy Stores